English

Introductory Statement

This plan was drafted by the Principal of Doolin NS. The draft was circulated to all teachers and was considered at a subsequent staff meeting.  Following detailed discussions, it was amended to respond to the needs of our school.

Rationale

We have decided to formulate a whole school plan at this time as a logical follow-on from having participated in in-service in the Revised English Curriculum.  During our review process, some concern was expressed regarding pupil achievement in certain aspects of our English programme. We have therefore decided that pupils would benefit from the development and implementation of a co-ordinated programme of learning.

Relationship to the Characteristic Spirit of the School

In Doolin NS, we are committed to the holistic development of all pupils in order to assist them to contribute and play a fulfilling role in their own community.  We see the development of their language skills as being central to this process.  We believe that the ability of our pupils to communicate fluently, confidently and effectively will contribute greatly to the development of their self-esteem and their personal growth.  We also believe that their academic progress depends to a large extent on their ability to communicate orally and thence through the written word.  In our school, we attach a high priority to giving pupils a command of the English language.

General Aims

  1. To enable the children to speak, read and write independently and effectively.
  2. To foster an enjoyment and appreciation of the English language.

Broad Objectives, Content and Methodologies

The broad objectives, content and methodologies for the teaching and learning of oral language, reading and writing are detailed on pages two to thirty one.  Each of these areas is presented under the four strand headings of the Revised English Curriculum.

Oral Language

Broad Objectives

The aim of this plan is to provide a structured sequential programme for teachers to enable children to:

  1. Gain pleasure and fulfilment from language activity
  2. Develop the capacity to express intuitions, feelings, impressions ideas and reactions in response to real and imaginary situations through talk and discussion, experimentation and the development of ideas.
  3. Develop fluency, explicitness and confidence in communication.
  4. Develop listening skills, language conventions, vocabulary, aesthetic response and language manipulation.

Oral Language:Sample Content for Junior & Senior Infants

Developing Receptiveness to Oral   Language

Developing Competence &   Confidence in Using Oral Language

Developing Cognitive Abilities   Through Oral Language

Developing Emotional &   Imaginative Life Through Oral Language

  • Experience,   recognise and observe simple commands.
  • Listen to a   story or description and respond to it.
  • Hear, repeat and   elaborate words, phrases and sentences modelled by the teacher.
  • Use and   interpret tone of voice expressing varying emotions.
  • Learn to adapt   verbal and non-verbal behaviour to secure and maintain the attention of a   partner.
  • Mime and   interpret gesture, movement and attitude conveying various emotions.
  • Talk about past   and present experiences, and plan, predict and speculate about future and   imaginary experiences.
  • Choose appropriate   words to name and describe things and events.
  • Experiment with   descriptive words to add elaborative detail.
  • Combine simple   sentences through the use of connecting words.
  • Initiate and   sustain a conversation on a particular topic.
  • Use language to   perform common social functions.
  • Provide further   information in response to the teacher’s prompting.
  • Listen to a   story or a narrative and ask questions about it.
  • Focus on   descriptive detail and begin to be explicit in relation to people, places,   times, processes, events, colour, shape, size, position.
  • Discuss   different possible solutions to simple problems.
  • Ask questions in   order to satisfy curiosity about the world.
  • Show   understanding of text.
  • Reflect on and   talk about a wide range of everyday experience and feelings.
  • Create and tell   stories.
  • Listen to, learn   and retell a rich variety of stories, rhymes and songs.
  • Respond through   discussion, mime and role-playing to stories, rhymes and songs heard and   learnt.
  • Use language to   create and sustain imaginary situations in play.
  • Listen to, learn   and recite rhymes, including nonsense rhymes.
  • Listen to, learn   and ask riddles.
  • Create real and   imaginary sound worlds.
  • Recognise and   re-create sounds in the immediate environment.
  • Experiment with   different voices in role-playing.

 

Oral Language: Sample  Methodologies for Junior & Senior Infants

 

 

Note: Many teaching methodologies   appropriate to the development of oral language are inherent in the content   detailed on the previous page.

 

  • Giving of   instructions in class and wider school context e.g. PE, school playground.
  • Instruction   games e.g. ‘O Grady Says’, ‘Follow the Leader’, Drawing and pupils giving   instructions to each other in pairs, groups.
  • Elaboration of   pupils own news by teacher.
  • Practice of   social greetings e.g. introduce self and others, greet and say goodbye.
  • Read to children   daily emphasising tone of voice, facial expression in reading story,   occasionally inviting outside storyteller / older pupil.
  • Re-read the same   story occasionally, pupils choose the story to be read, read stories on   particular topics e.g. animals / pets.
  • Pupils continue   / finish the story e.g. ‘what do you think happened next?’
  • Teacher / pupils   ask questions based on the story read, pupils invited to tell the story in   their own words.
  • Chinese whispers.
  • Drama – role   play and miming based on stories, poetry, rhymes, popular films / videos,   home situations, shopping, school etc.
  • Use of puppets   and dress-up box.
  • ‘Close your eyes   and describe what you see’, giving a definite topic e.g. a beautiful garden.
  • Name objects in   the  classroom, school bag, home etc.
  • Expand   vocabulary through addition of descriptive words e.g. big / small, heavy /   light (Maths language), warm / cold (environmental language), run / walk /   skip (P.E.).
  • Listen to music   (e.g. Religion programme) and ask ‘how does it make you feel?’
  • Show and Tell,   encouraging pupil to use sentences e.g. ‘This is my doll.  She has blonde hair…’
  • Describe a   friend.
  • Starters e.g. ‘I   like…’  ‘After school I…’
  • Send pupil on a   message e.g. ‘May I have 20 copies please’
  • Emphasise   appropriate vocabulary / sentence structure when requesting and relating.
  • Provide   vocabulary required to describe people, places etc.
  • Teasing out   situations e.g. ‘If you were lost, what would you do’.
  • Encourage   questions about the world around us (SESE).
  • Use big books as   a springboard for discussion.
  • Circle Time,   Stay Safe, Alive O.
  • Picture and / or   object stimuli to create a story, create a collaborative story.
  • Listening to   rhymes, tapes etc. alerting pupils in advance to listen for specific sounds.
  • Listen to and   learn poems, nursery rhymes, nonsense rhymes, jingles and riddles, reciting   individually and in groups (revise regularly).
  • Listen to, focus   on and re-create sounds e.g. animals, imaginary and add sounds to a story.

Oral Language:Sample  Content for 1st & 2nd Classes

 

Developing Receptiveness to Oral   Language

Developing Competence and Confidence   in Using Oral Language

Developing Cognitive Abilities   Through Oral Language

Developing Emotional and Imaginative   Life Through Oral Language

  • Experience   challenging vocabulary and sentence structure from the teacher.
  • Listen to   stories, descriptions, instructions and directions and respond to them.
  • Listen to sounds   and respond to them.
  • Become more   adept in using appropriate verbal and non-verbal behaviour in order to secure   and maintain the attention of the listener.
  • Use gesture and   movement to extend the meaning of what he/she is saying.
  • Express in mime   various emotions and reactions, and interpret the emotions and reactions of   others.
  • Talk about and   reflect on past and present experiences, and plan, predict, anticipate and   speculate about future and imaginary experiences.
  • Experiment with   more elaborate vocabulary and sentence structure in order to extend and   explore meaning.
  • Experiment with   word order and examine its implications for meaning and clarity.
  • Focus on the   subject under discussion and sustain a conversation on it.
  • Initiate   discussions, respond to the initiatives of others, and have practice in   taking turns.
  • Engage in real   and imaginary situations to perform different social functions.
  • Give a   description, recount a narrative or describe a process, and answer questions   about it.
  • Listen to other   children describe experiences and ask questions about their reactions to   them.
  • Become increasingly   explicit in relation to people, places, times, processes and events by adding   elaborative detail to what he/she describes and narrates.
  • Listen to a   story or a narrative and ask questions about it.
  • Engage in real   and imaginary situations involving language use.
  • Ask questions   that will satisfy his/her curiosity and wonder.
  • Describe   everyday experiences and events.
  • Express feelings   in order to clarify them and explain them to others.
  • Tell stories to   his/her own words and answer questions about them.
  • Listen to, read,   learn and recite a varied and appropriate repertoire of rhymes and poems.
  • Re-create   stories and poems in improvisational drama.
  • Use play and   improvisational drama to sustain imaginary situations.
  • Listen to and   say nonsense words and unusual words.
  • Listen to, learn   and tell riddles and jokes.
  • Clap the rhythms   of poems and rhymes.
  • Listen to, read,   learn and recite more sophisticated nonsense verse and rhymes.
  • Recognise and   re-create sounds in the environment.
  • Create real and   imaginary sound worlds.
  • Use imaginative   play to create humorous characters and situations.

 

 

Oral Language:Sample  Methodologies for 1st & 2nd Classes

 

Note: Many teaching methodologies   appropriate to the development of oral language are inherent in the content   detailed on the previous page. 

  • Talk and   discussion.
  • Circle Time
  • Consider   advertisements, posters, themes of interest.
  • Role play.
  • Hotseating – one   pupil takes on the role of a story / poem character and the pupils ask   questions of him / her.
  • Brainstorming.
  • Wordwebs.
  • Listening games   e.g. Chinese whispers, auditory tapes / CDs / activities, Simon Says,   clapping games.
  • Story telling –   rich and varied selection of texts.
  • Cross-age   tutoring and sharing stories.
  • Visitors to   school / classroom e.g. garda, priest, storyteller / poet, touring theatre.
  • Newsboard –   newspaper cuttings, photographs.
  • Reciting poems   and rhymes.
  • Identifying word   families, rhyming words, onsets and rimes.
  • Call out a list   of words twice omitting one the second time.
  • Teacher gives a   list of numbers.  Pupils repeat.  Repeat in reverse order.
  • Teacher taps   rhythm.  Pupil repeats.
  • Twenty   questions.
  • Pupils listen   for the silly sentence / word that shouldn’t be there.
  • Listen to sounds   inside / outside the classroom.
  • Different child   presents news / weather / area of interest each morning.
  • Pupil takes turn   for the day for answering phone, door, going with messages.
  • Introduce new   words e.g. night words, scary words, magical words.
  • List new words   on the wall.
  • Presentations to   own / other class e.g. project, poem.
  • Follow a recipe.
  • Kim’s Game –   identify the missing object.
  • ‘What would you   do if…?’ e.g. found an injured animal, found a €1,000 lottery ticket.
  • Finish the   story.

 

 

Oral Language: Sample Content for 3rd & 4th Classes

 

Developing Receptiveness to Oral Language

Developing Competence and Confidence   in Using Oral Language

Developing Cognitive Abilities   Through Oral Language

Developing Emotional &   Imaginative Life Through Oral Language

  • Experience the   teacher’s use of challenging vocabulary and sentence structure.
  • Listen to,   retell and tape a narrative or a description, taking turns giving the   account.
  • Give and follow   instructions on how to perform a particular task or process.
  • Become   increasingly aware of the importance of gesture, facial expression, tone of voice,   audibility and clarity of enunciation in communicating with others.
  • Use of mime to   convey ideas, reactions, emotions, desires and attitudes.
  • Discuss the use   and effect of music, sound effects and non-verbal clues in audio tapes, video   tapes and film clips.
  • Give and take   turns in speaking and experience a classroom environment in which tolerance   for the views of others is fostered.
  • Initiate   conversations and respond to the initiatives of others in talking about   experiences and activities.
  • Present ideas   that are relevant to the subject in a logical sequence.
  • Summarise and   prioritise ideas.
  • Discuss the   meanings and origins of words, phrases and expressions with the teacher.
  • Become aware of   new words and new connotations of words through his/her reading and writing   experience.
  • Play synonym and   antonym games.
  • Become familiar   with the functions without necessarily using technical grammatical terms.
  • Practice the   common social functions in the everyday context of class and school and   through improvisational drama.
  • Make lists of   local expressions and words.
  • Use   improvisational drama to re-create well-known characters.
  • Hear, discuss   and react to local storytellers.
  • Discuss issues   that directly affect his/her life.
  • Discuss a story   being read and predict future events and likely outcomes in it.
  • Discuss   different possible solutions to problems.
  • Discuss what   he/she knows of a particular topic or process as a basis for encountering new   problems.
  • Discuss causes   and effects in relation to processes and events and predict possible   outcomes.
  • Listen to a   presentation and discuss and decide which are the most important questions to   ask.
  • Learn how to use   the basic key questions.
  • Make   presentations to the class about his/her own particular interests.
  • Justify personal   likes and dislikes.
  • Argue a point of   view and try to persuade others to support it.
  • Explore   historical events through improvisational drama.
  • Explore   reactions to ideas through improvisational drama.
  • Describe   everyday experiences to the class or group and discuss them.
  • Discuss   favourite moments, important events and exciting characters in a story, play   or poem.
  • Express   reactions to events and characters in stories.
  • Discuss   reactions to poems.
  • Create and tell   stories to the class or group and retell them after questioning, comparing   the versions.
  • Express feelings   and attitudes through improvisational drama.
  • Create and   sustain imaginary contexts through improvisational drama.
  • React to poems   through improvisational drama.
  • Dramatise   stories.
  • Experience and   enjoy playful aspects of language.

Oral Language: Sample Methodologies for 3rd & 4th Classes

 

 Note: Many teaching methodologies   appropriate to the development of oral language are inherent in the content   detailed on the previous page.

 

  • General   classroom conversation in all subject areas.
  • Informal story   telling, life experiences, news, current affairs.
  • Use of   alternative words, phrases, sentence structures.
  • Listen to   commercial recordings / own recordings of stories and accounts.
  • Chinese   whispers.
  • Pass on a story   – each child adds on.
  • Listening to and   identifying sounds recorded on tape.
  • Describing a   process e.g. how to make a cup of tea, how to make a photocopy etc.
  • Listening to and   completing tasks e.g. in PE lesson.
  • Turn down sound   on TV – identify moods etc.
  • Mime – charades.
  • Use different   tones of voice e.g. say ‘I need a cup of tea’ in 5 different ways.
  • Display anger,   sadness, joy, tiredness etc.
  • Communicate   using mime e.g. ‘I’m going out’.
  • Role play   arguments as to why / why not e.g. I need a mobile phone.
  • Listen to a   piece of music, select words to describe it, make up a story behind it.
  • View a short   video clip, turn down the music, select language to describe the extract.
  • Use drum-tapping   to convey moods e.g. happy, sad, angry, agitated, excited etc.
  • Hotseating.
  • Word webs.
  • Collect local   expressions.
  • Act out sections   of the class novel.
  • Relay role play   i.e. pupil takes place of existing character in middle of role play.
  • Engage local   storytellers.
  • Make list of   questions – correct use of why, what, where, when as a reaction to a passage.
  • Making of   presentations on project work etc. followed by question and answer session.
  • Social   interactions – greeting / introducing visitor, answering the phone.
  • Working in   groups and introducing members.
  • Verse speaking.

 

Oral Language: Sample Content for 5th & 6th Classes

 

Developing Receptiveness to Oral   Language

Developing Competence and Confidence   in Using Oral Language

Developing Cognitive Abilities   Through Oral Language

Developing Emotional &   Imaginative Life Through Oral Language

  • Experience from the teacher a growing   elaboration and sophistication in the use of vocabulary and sentence   structure.
  • Listen to expressions, reactions,   opinions and interpretations and retell or summarise them.
  • Listen to radio broadcasts and   discuss what has been learned.
  • Follow detailed instructions or   directions from others in order to test their accuracy.
  • Take part in games in which unseen   objects are identified from descriptions given by other pupils.
  • Be continually aware of the   importance of gesture, facial expression, audibility and clarity of   enunciation in communicating with others.
  • Use mime to convey ideas, reactions,   emotions, desires and attitudes.
  • Interpret mood, attitude, emotion and   atmosphere in video extracts, advertisements, paintings and photographs.
  • Listen to or watch sound tapes,   videos and films and discuss how sound effects enhance the content.
  • Listen to authors reading and   discussing their own work.
  • Acquire the ability to give detailed   instructions and directions.
  • Converse freely and confidently on a   range of topics.
  • Give and take turns in an environment   where tolerance for the views of others is fostered.
  • Practise and use improvisational   drama to acquire a facility in performing more elaborate social functions.
  • Discuss the positive and negative   effects of jargon, slang and cliché, and express examples of them in his/her   own language.
  • Understand the functions and know the   names of the parts of speech.
  • Learn about and name the basic   properties of nouns and verbs.
  • Become familiar with compound and   complex sentences and know and understand the terms ‘phrase’ and ‘clause’.
  • Explore the possibilities of language   and sentence structure in expressing increasingly complex thoughts.
  • Discuss the meaning, effect and   diversity of local words and expressions.
  • Hear accents and dialects other than   his/her own on tape and on video and discuss them.
  • Use improvisational drama to learn   how local idiom, accent and dialect can influence the effect of language in   particular situations.
  • Discuss ideas of major concern.
  • Discuss ideas and concepts   encountered in other areas of the curriculum.
  • Use a discussion of the familiar as   the basis of a more formal or objective grasp of a topic or concept.
  • Use the basic key questions and   checking questions as a means of extending knowledge.
  • Listen to a presentation on a   particular topic, decide through discussion which are the most appropriate   questions to ask, and then prioritise them.
  • Argue points of view from the   perspective of agreement and disagreement through informal discussion and in   the context of formal debates.
  • Justify and defend particular   opinions or attitudes and try to persuade others to support a particular   point of view.
  • Respond to arguments presented by the   teacher.
  • Discuss the value, truth or relevance   of popular ideas, causes and proverbs.
  • Explore and express conflicts of   opinion through improvisational drama
  • Explore historical contexts through   improvisational drama.
  • Discuss with others his/her reactions   to everyday experiences and to local, national and world events.
  • Discuss the concerns of other   children.
  • Discuss ideas, concepts and images   encountered in literature.
  • Discuss personal reading and writing.
  • Express individual responses to poems   and literature and discuss different interpretations.
  • Discuss plays, films and television   programmes.
  • Experience and enjoy playful aspects   of language.

Oral Language: Sample Methodologies for 5th & 6th Classes

 

 Note: Many teaching methodologies   appropriate to the development of oral language are inherent in the content   detailed on the previous page.

 

  • Discussion –   local, national and global issues, sport, pupils’ concerns and social issues.
  • Debate topical   issues e.g. homework.
  • Instructions –   giving, receiving, interpreting.
  • Non-verbal   communication.
  • Assigning   conversation to pictures.
  • Character   interviews.
  • Character role   plays – creating a story using a selection of characters.
  • News telling.
  • Narratives.
  • Explanations.
  • Story   reconstruction – using sets of picture sequences, groups of pupils put the   pictures into a logical sequence and practise retelling the story around the   circle.
  • Defending   viewpoints.
  • Story   composition.
  • Questioning.
  • Creative inquiry   – ‘What if?’
  • Questioning and   logic.
  • Comparing and   grouping.
  • Brainstorming   and building knowledge.
  • Description   activities.
  • Circle Time.
  • Communication   skills – clear, distinct, concise, coherent.
  • Respectful for   communication.
  • Etiquette and   social convention.

 

Reading

 Broad Objectives

The aim of this plan is to provide a structured and sequential programme for teachers to enable children to:

  1.  Develop print awareness, phonemic awareness, word identification strategies and sight vocabulary.
  2. Develop their comprehension and analytical strategies.
  3. Expand their understanding and usage of grammar, syntax and punctuation.
  4. Expose them to and develop their appreciation of the richness and diversity of reading material.
  5. Experience the pleasure and fulfilment to be gained from reading.

Reading: Sample Content for Junior & Senior Infants

Developing Concepts of Language &   Print

Developing Reading Skills

& Strategies

Developing Interests, Attitudes &   the

Ability to Think

Responding to Text

  • Listen to, enjoy   and respond to stories, nursery rhymes, poems and songs.
  • Become an active   listener through the development of a range of listening activities based on   stories read or told.
  • Play with   language to develop an awareness of sounds.
  • Develop a sense   of rhythm and rhyme.
  • Become familiar   with a wide range of environmental print, beginning with print in the   classroom.
  • Learn about the   basic terminology and conventions of books.
  • Read texts   created by himself/herself and by other children in collaboration with the   teacher.
  • Learn to   recognise and name the letters of the alphabet.
  • Develop an   awareness of some letter-sound relationships
  • Experience the   reading process being modelled.
  • Handle books and   browse through them.
  • Encounter early   reading through collaborative reading of large-format books and   language-experience material.
  • Build up a sight   vocabulary of common words from personal experience, from experience of   environmental print and from books read.
  • Learn to isolate   the beginning sound of a word or syllable.
  • Learn to isolate   beginning and final sounds in written words.
  • Learn to isolate   the part of a word or a syllable which allows it to rhyme with another word   or syllable.
  • Use knowledge of   word order, illustration, context and initial letters to identify unknown   words
  • Engage in shared   reading activities.
  • Re-read, retell   and act out familiar stories, poems or parts of stories.
  • Recall and talk   about significant events and details in stories.
  • Analyse and   interpret characters, situations, events and sequences presented pictorially
  • Predict future   incidents and outcomes in stories.
  • Differentiate   between text and pictures.
  • Understand the   function of text.
  • Associate print   with enjoyment through listening to stories and poems read aloud.
  • Respond to   characters, situations and story details, relating them to personal   experience.
  • Perceive reading   as a shared, enjoyable experience.
  • Record response   to text through pictures and captions.
  • Pursue and   develop individual interests through engagement with books.

 

Reading: Sample Methodologies for Junior & Senior Infants

 

 Note: Many teaching methodologies   appropriate to the development of reading capacity are inherent in the   content detailed on the previous page.

 

  • Listen to and   respond to teacher’s /  taped stories   and rhymes.
  • Simple   re-telling of stories focusing on sequencing, reading a story a few times and   children joining in, stories with repetitive phrases.
  • Listen to and   repeat in proper sequence, alerting children in advance re what to listen   for.
  • Marching and   clapping games, teacher claps and children copy.
  • Making of simple   percussion instruments.
  • Clap syllables   e.g. a cat is __ (fat)
  • Finish line of a   poem / rhyme.
  • B/a/t = bat.
  • Onset and rime   e.g. d – og.
  • Clap for each   syllable e.g. John – 1 clap, Mary – 2 claps.
  • Follow   structured phonics programme.
  • Labels in   classroom, alphabet frieze, labelling charts using flashcards.
  • Allow   opportunities to handle a variety of books – cover, author, illustrations,   left to right, page turning.
  • Shared reading   e.g. big books, our news, language experience charts.
  • Shared reading   with parents, older pupils.
  • Letter / sound   relationships using appropriate resources e.g. Letterland, Jolly Phonics.
  • Teacher   modelling reading process.
  • Develop sight   vocabulary of common words e.g. treasure hunt, word walk in locality.
  • Isolate   beginning sound e.g. onset and rime, word families, adding on rhymes, games   e.g. foods that begin with b.
  • Rhyming part of   words using simple poems e.g. ‘There was a man called Pat, he had a pet __’
  • Pre-reading   activities, reading scheme, library reading.
  • Bingo, word   matching.
  • Re-read, re-tell   and act out e.g. drama box, Alive O, previous stories.
  • Respond to   characters / relate to events e.g. ‘Did that ever happen to you?’
  • Draw self in   picture with characters or in scene from story, draw favourite part of the   story / favourite character.
  • Respond to text   through pictures, bubble conversation, captions.
  • Captions with   marla / magnetic letters, write words under pictures etc.
  • Pupils invited   to bring in and discuss their favourite books from home.
  • Books about   favourite things.

 

Reading: Sample  Content for 1st & 2nd Classes

 

Developing Strategies

Reading for Pleasure &   Information

Developing Interests, Attitudes &   the Ability to Think

Responding to Text

  • Continue to   experience the reading process being modelled.
  • Engage in shared   reading activities.
  • Visit the school   library and the local library.
  • Continue to   build a sight vocabulary of common words from books read and from personal   experience.
  • Engage in   activities designed to increase awareness of sounds.
  • Learn about the   sounds associated with the part of a word or syllable that allows it to rhyme   with another word or syllable.
  • Learn about the   sounds associated with the beginning of a word or syllable.
  • Learn to connect   the beginnings of words or syllables with their rhyming parts as an auditory   and visual exercise.
  • Learn about   common word endings, word families and roots of words
  • Use knowledge of   letter-sound relationships, grammar and syntax and surrounding text when   attempting to identify unfamiliar words.
  • Self-correct   reading errors when what he/she reads does not make sense.
  • Develop reading   skills through engaging with reading material appropriate to his/her stage of   development.
  • Adapt his/her   reading style for different purposes.
  • Read from a   range of children’s literature, choosing material for reading during silent   reading periods.
  • Engage in   personal reading.
  • Learn to find   books in a classroom or school library.
  • Read aloud to   share a text with an audience.
  • Find information   and share it with others.
  • Perform simple   information retrieval tasks.
  • Pursue   individual interests through independent reading of fiction and non-fiction.
  • Adopt an active   approach to a text by posing his/her own questions.
  • Give   recommendations to and receive recommendations from the wider community of   readers on the choice of reading material.
  • Develop   comprehension strategies.
  • Perform alphabetical   order tasks.
  • Predict future   events and outcomes in a book that is being read aloud.
  • Express a more   formal response by giving a considered personal opinion of a book in oral or   in written form.
  • Use information   technology to increase motivation to read and to enhance reading development.
  • Continue to   listen to and enjoy stories and poems being read aloud.
  • Engage in   spare-moment reading and browsing by having ready access to reading material.
  • Engage with a   wider variety of text.
  • Experience   enhanced levels of self-esteem through success in reading.
  • Listen to entire   stories read aloud in instalments.
  • Respond to   characters and events in a story.
  • Explore   different attitudes and feelings by imagining what it would be like to be   certain characters.
  • Engage frequently   in informal discussion of books with teachers and others.

Reading: Sample Methodologies for 1st & 2nd Classes

 

Note:   Many teaching methodologies appropriate to the development of reading   capacity are inherent in the content detailed on the previous page.

 

  • Read to children   a rich variety of stories, facts and poetry.
  • Develop sound   awareness through focusing on sounds associated with letters and letter   clusters and patterns of sounds in words.
  • Rhyming words,   onsets and rimes, different onsets, different rimes.
  • Shared reading –   parents / older siblings / older pupils.
  • Individual /   independent reading.
  • Silent reading /   personal reading.
  • Reading for   different purposes e.g. browsing, simple scanning, skimming.
  • Encourage use of   class and local library.
  • Provide   interesting and varied selection of books in class library and continuously   change / supplement selection.
  • Use of tapes,   storybooks and tapes and CD Roms.
  • Use of comics,   catalogues and local publications to augment library contents.
  • Simple   information retrieval e.g. table of contents, simple index.
  • Book reviews.
  • Write-a-Book   Project – read other pupils’ books.
  • Reading   programmes on CD Roms e.g. Reader Rabbit, Accelerated Reading Programme.
  • Alphabetical   order exercises.
  • Discuss books,   authors, plot with other pupils, teacher, parents.
  • Recall and   discuss significant events in stories.
  • Analyse and   interpret characters and situations.

 

  Reading: Sample  Content for 3rd & 4th Classes

Developing Strategies

Reading for Pleasure &   Information

Developing Interests, Attitudes,   Information Retrieval Skills & the Ability to Think

Responding to Text

  • Use more than   one strategy when reading unfamiliar text.
  • Identify   unfamiliar words by reference to word parts, prefixes and suffixes.
  • Continue to   self-correct reading errors.
  • Become an   increasingly independent reader.
  • Understand the   relationship between text and illustration.
  • Refine his/her   listening skills through hearing the teacher read aloud.
  • Have access to a   plentiful supply of books in the classroom and in the school library.
  • Use library   facilities outside the school.
  • Select personal   reading material and develop personal taste in reading for pleasure and   information.
  • Experience   different types of text.
  • Engage with a   wide variety of poetry and verse on a regular basis.
  • Develop basic   information retrieval skills.
  • Use simple   dictionaries effectively.
  • Extend   participation in listening and silent reading activities.
  • Read short books   in one sitting to experience success in reading.
  • Explore new   interests and perspectives through reading.
  • Read books   independently.
  • Seek   recommendations for books to read and recommend books to others.
  • Continue to use   information technology to increase motivation to read and to enhance reading   development.
  • Know the   structure and terminology of books.
  • Develop skills   in locating and handling books through using well-stocked school and   classroom libraries.
  • Continue to   develop a range of comprehension strategies to deal with narrative,   expository and representational reading material.
  • Use a knowledge   of printing conventions as an aid to expression and comprehension.
  • Keep a record of   his/her reading in various forms.
  • Extend and   develop his/her response to increasingly challenging reading material.
  • Engage in talk   about books.
  • Talk about   choice of books and the reasons for choices.
  • Recognise and   discuss differences in reading tastes.
  • Share responses   with other children and with adults to cultivate a community of readers.
  • Experience a   shared response to fiction through the use of a class novel.
  • Read aloud with   expression.

 Reading: Sample Methodologies for 3rd & 4th Classes

 

Note:   Many teaching methodologies appropriate to the development of reading   capacity are inherent in the content detailed on the previous page.

 

  • Skim / scan   through a passage.
  • Read silently /   out loud.
  • Teacher provides   questions first and pupils read passage to find answers.
  • Pick out the   sentence which proves the answer.
  • Phonetic   awareness.
  • Begin with a   discussion of the illustrations.
  • Personalise the   story.
  • Use of class set   of dictionaries.
  • Use of computer   to source specified information with questions being provided at outset.
  • Distribute   poetry books, pupils read and select their favourite poem.
  • Pupils select   which poem will be learned.
  • Book reviews and   recommendations for other pupils to read.
  • Read book and   present views to class.
  • Group read same   material.  Pupils in group have   different roles to discuss material.
  • USSR –   Uninterrupted Sustained Silent Reading.
  • Reading various   packaging for information.
  • Reading of   brochures, fliers, leaflets, circulars.
  • Read newspaper   headline and predict story.
  • Word building.
  • Cloze procedure.
  • Class novel.
  • Read other   pupils’ work e.g. Write-a-Book.
  • Pupil reads a   story and other pupils dramatise different endings.
  • Select 5 well   known characters from different stories and create a new story for them.
  • Invite younger /   older children to read to class.

 

 Reading: Sample Content for 5th & 6th Classes

Developing Strategies

Reading for Pleasure &   Information

Developing Interests, Attitudes, Information   Retrieval Skills & the Ability to Think

Responding to Text

  • Achieve   proficiency in word identification by refining the different word   identification skills.
  • Improve his/her   ability to recognise and understand words by using root words, prefixes, suffixes,   and syllabication.
  • Engage with an   increasing range of narrative, expository and representational text.
  • Become   self-reliant, confident, independent readers, having time in class for   sustained silent reading.

 

  • Read widely as   an independent reader from a more challenging range of reading material,   including stories, poems, myths, legends, novels and non-fiction texts   appropriate to his/her age and reading ability.
  • Engage in books   in group or in whole-class settings.
  • Learn about the   structure and appreciate the function of the component parts of a newspaper.
  • Participate in   organised visits to the public library and avail of the mobile library   service.
  • Read to satisfy   personal interests.
  • Listen to, read,   learn, recite and respond to a challenging range of poetry.
  • Have access to a   wide range of reading material in the classroom and/or school a library.
  • Continue to keep   a record of personal reading in various forms.
  • Use   comprehension skills such as analysing, confirming, evaluating, synthesising   and correlating to aid deduction, problem solving and prediction.
  • Develop study   skills such as skimming, scanning, note-taking and summarising.
  • Retrieve and   interpret information in a variety of ways.
  • Support   arguments and opinions with evidence from the text.
  • Read and   interpret different kinds of functional text.
  • Explore   appropriate non-fiction texts for various purposes.
  • Use information   retrieval strategies in cross-curricular settings.
  • Distinguish   between fact and opinion, and bias and objectivity, in text and in the media.
  • Use the school,   classroom and public libraries to develop greater insight into book location,   classification and organisation.
  • Find information   relevant to his/her purpose in non-fiction texts, graphs and pictorial and   diagrammatic data, and through the use of information technology.
  • Hear the teacher   model a response to poems, fiction, plays and parts of plays.
  • Respond to   poetry and fiction through discussion, writing, drama, the visual arts and   dance.
  • Relate personal   experience to the ideas and emotions conveyed in the text.
  • Appreciate   issues in fiction.
  • Examine   similarities and differences in various types of text.
  • Continue to   share response to an ever-increasing variety of texts with the wider   community of readers.
  • Browse through,   handle, discuss, recommend and select books for independent reading.
  • Develop   individuality as a reader by experiencing success and the enhancement of   self-esteem through reading.
  • Read aloud from   a personal choice of texts to entertain and inform an audience.
  • Listen to books   or extracts from books and poetry read aloud or presented on tape, radio or   television.

 

Reading: Sample Methodologies for 5th & 6th Classes

 

Note: Many teaching methodologies   appropriate to the teaching of reading capacity are inherent in the content   detailed on the previous page.

 

  • Reading to   pupils.
  • Modelled reading   by teacher / pupil.
  • Guided reading.
  • Shared reading.
  • Independent   reading.
  • Performance   reading.
  • Paired-reading.
  • USSR –   Uninterrupted Sustained Silent Reading.
  • Research   reading.
  • Encouraging use   of class / city library.
  • Book Fairs.
  • Project work.
  • Recalling,   retelling, predicting.
  • Analysis,   explanation, mood, issues, theme.
  • Inference.
  • Deduction.
  • Summarising.
  • Evaluation.
  • Correlation,   classification.
  • Use of different   genres.
  • Reading   strategies – scanning, skimming, research reading, reflective reading.
  • Book discussions   involving comparisons of style etc.
  • Class reader.
  • Class novel.
  • CD reading.
  • Magazines,   newspapers.
  • Visit by author,   poet.

 

Writing

 Broad Objectives

The aim of this plan is to provide a structured and sequential programme for teachers to enable children to:

  1.  Write clearly, correctly and fluently.
  2.  Use a wide range of vocabulary.
  3.  Use grammar and punctuation appropriately.
  4.  Write in a wide variety of genres encompassing differing styles, purposes, audiences and level of formality.
  5.  Experience opportunities to develop presentation, editing and publishing skills.
  6.  Engage in collaborative writing experiences.
  7.  Develop a high standard of penmanship.

 Writing: Sample Content for Junior & Senior Infants

Creating & Fostering the Impulse   to Write

Developing Competence, Confidence and   the Ability to Write Independently

Clarifying Thought Through Writing

Developing Emotional &   Imaginative Life Through Writing

  • Experience and   enjoy a print-rich environment.
  • Receive help   from the teacher, who will sometimes act as scribe to assist with accuracy   and presentation.
  • Write and draw   frequently.
  • Write for   different audiences.
  • See personal   writing displayed.
  • Read personal writing   aloud and hear it read.
  • Learn to form and name individual letters   using various materials.
  • Write and draw.
  • Understand the left-right, top-bottom   orientation of writing.
  • Develop a satisfactory grip of writing   implements.
  • Copy words from signs in the environment.
  • Copy letters and words informally as part   of class activities.
  • Write his/her name.
  • Use labels to name familiar people or   things.
  • Write letters and words from memory.
  • Become aware of lower-case and capital   letters and the full stop.
  • Develop the confidence to use approximate   spelling.
  • Begin to develop conventional spelling of   simple words.
  • See the teacher model writing as an   enjoyable experience.
  • Choose subjects for drawing and writing.
  • Choose the form   of expression he/she finds appropriate
  • Draw a picture   and write about it.
  • Draw and write   about everyday experience or about something just learned.
  • Writing naming   words and add descriptive words.
  • Rewrite   sentences to make the message clearer.
  • Draw and write about feelings.
  • Draw and write about things he/she likes   and dislikes.
  • Draw and write about sensory experiences.
  • Draw and write stories.
  • Hear a rich variety of stories, rhymes and   songs and write about them.
  • Use mime and   role-playing to create imaginary situations and then draw and write about them.

 Writing: Sample Methodologies for Junior & Senior Infants

 

Note: Many teaching methodologies appropriate to the development of writing capacity are inherent in the content detailed on the previous page.

 

  • Provision of   print-rich environment e.g. labels, flashcards, posters.
  • Teacher as   scribe – pupils tell story and teacher writes and pupils may copy / type.
  • Compilation of   Our News on flip chart pad.
  • Scribbling,   writing patterns using different media e.g. chalk, crayon, paint.
  • Tracing of basic   letters on sandpaper and sand, making letters with marla and use of magnetic   letters.
  • Letter formation   including lower case, upper case, capital letters and full stop.
  • Making cards and   writing simple messages.
  • Copying /   writing own name, environmental labels, words and simple sentences.
  • Writing for   different people / purposes e.g. card, name on art work.
  • Display personal   writing and read pupils’ writing aloud.
  • Making of little   books e.g. My Book about…Autumn.
  • Teacher models   letter formation on the blackboard / air and pupils imitate.
  • Start with dot –   left / right, top / bottom. front / back.
  • Teach writing   grip progressing from chubby crayons to chublets, to chubby pencils to   standard pencils.
  • Allow children   to spell own words – approximate spelling.
  • Draw a picture and   write about it e.g. name, caption, sentence.
  • Add descriptive   words to naming words.
  • Dominoes – match   the start of a sentence with an ending and write.
  • Draw and write   about feelings e.g. happy face and write word ‘happy’, I feel sad / happy   when…

 

 Writing: Sample Content for 1st & 2nd Classes

Creating & Fostering the Impulse   to Write

Developing Competence, Confidence   & the Ability to Write Independently

Clarifying Thought Through Writing

Developing Emotional &   Imaginative Life Through Writing

  • Experience a   classroom environment that encourages writing.
  • Observe the   teacher as he/she models writing stories.
  • Seek help from   the teacher in order to achieve accuracy and an appropriate standard   presentation.
  • Experience how a   story structure is organised by reading and listening to fiction.
  • Write regularly   for different audiences.
  • Choose topics to   write about.
  • Explore   different genres.
  • Work with other   children when writing.
  • Have writing   valued.
  • Experience an abundance of oral language   activity when preparing a writing task.
  • Realise that first attempts at writing are   not necessarily the finished product and learn to undertake second drafts in   order to improve writing.
  • Understand that the conventions of   punctuation help to make meaning clearer in writing.
  • Spell words in a recognisable way based on   an awareness of the most common spelling strings and patterns.
  • Use approximate spelling as an interim   measure in mastering the conventions of spelling.
  • Spell correctly a range of familiar,   important and regularly occurring words, and use a variety of sources as aids   to spelling.
  • Choose topics for writing after conferring   with the teacher.
  • Have regular opportunities to write for   himself/herself or for others.
  • Decide whether or not to re-draft a piece   of writing.
  • Confer with the teacher and others on the   quality of presentation.
  • Write notes and   messages to different audiences.
  • Write in a   variety of genres.
  • Write a version   of a story told by the teacher.
  • Write about   something that has been learned.
  • Write the   significant details about an event or an activity.
  • Write an   explanation for something.
  • Re-read work,   confer with the teacher or others about it, and then rewrite it.
  • Write a simple   sentence and add words to it to extend its meaning.
  • Listen to a   story and write down questions to ask about it.
  • Write answers to   questions asked by the teacher.
  • Express feelings in writing.
  • Write about experiences.
  • Listen to the experiences of others and   express reactions to them in writing.
  • Draw and write about sensory experience.
  • Write about feelings experienced in drama   activity.
  • Draw and write stories and poems.
  • Express in writing likes and dislikes about   events and characters in stories and poems.
  • Listen to music   and write about it.

Writing: Sample Methodologies for 1st & 2nd Classes 

 Note: Many teaching methodologies   appropriate to the development of writing capacity are inherent in the   content detailed on the previous page.

 

  • Teacher as   scribe, modelling story structure.
  • Cross-age   tutoring – older pupil as scribe for younger pupil.
  • Print-rich   environment e.g. labels, captions, displays of simple sentences / stories,   writing corner.
  • Oral preparation   for all written work.
  • Express feelings   in print, write about experiences, write about senses.
  • Spelling in   accordance with school policy.
  • Choose writing   topic through brainstorming, mind-mapping, drawing up lists of favourite   topics.
  • Pupils select   own topic to write about.
  • Personal writing   collections.
  • Include pupils’   writing in class library.
  • Free-writing in   personal journal.
  • Lists, messages,   reminders, letters, invitations.
  • Write for self,   other pupils, teacher, parents.
  • Write the   important details of an event e.g. school / local event.
  • Class story –   each pupil writes 5 – 10 sentences.
  • Writing pairs /   groups for editing and re-drafting.
  • Pupils read own   work to class / at assembly.
  • Displays of   writing in corridor.
  • Publish work in   an anthology / school newsletter.

 

 Writing: Sample Content for 3rd & 4th Classes

Creating and Fostering the Impulse to   Write

Developing Competence, Confidence and   the Ability to Write Independently

Clarifying Thought Through Writing

Developing Emotional and Imaginative   Life Through Writing

  • Experience a   classroom environment that encourages writing.
  • Observe the   teacher modelling different writing genres.
  • Use personal   reading as a stimulus to writing.
  • Write stories   that explore a variety of genres.
  • Re-read his/her   writing for pleasure.
  • Choose the   audience for which to write.
  • Choose both the   subject and form of his/her writing.
  • Receive and give   positive responses to writing.
  • See his/her   writing valued.
  • Write regularly, and gradually extend the   period over which a writing effort is sustained.
  • Engage in the writing of one piece over a   period.
  • Experience varied and consistent oral   language activity as a preparation for writing.
  • Learn to use questions as a mechanism for   expanding and developing a story.
  • Give sequence to ideas and events in   stories.
  • Develop an appreciation of how the intended   audience should influence the nature of a piece of writing.
  • Develop an awareness of the difference   between written language and oral language.
  • Learn to revise   and re-draft writing.
  • Write in a   variety of genres with greater sophistication.
  • Read a story and   write it in his/her own terms.
  • Read a narrative   or expository piece and summarise it.
  • Write about an   idea to explain it to someone else.
  • Write about why   he/she finds an idea attractive.
  • Write about   ideas encountered in other areas of the curriculum.
  • Write down   directions on how to perform a particular process.
  • Write a list of   questions about a particular topic and prioritise them.
  • Write a sentence   and elaborate on it by adding one or more ideas to it.
  • Expand and   clarify his/her thoughts on a particular idea or topic through drafting and   re-drafting.
  • Express his/her reactions to particular   experiences in writing.
  • Write about experiences and feelings in   diary form.
  • Write about feelings experienced in   improvisational drama.
  • Create stories and poems.
  • Write extended stories in book form.
  • Write about favourite moments, characters   and events in stories.
  • Express in writing his/her reactions to   poems.
  • Express in writing his/her reactions to   personal reading.
  • Use his/her own   artwork and that of others as a stimulus to writing.

Writing: Sample Methodologies for 3rd & 4th Classes

 Note: Many teaching methodologies   appropriate to the development of writing capacity are inherent in the   content detailed on the previous page.

 

  • Personal class   diary.
  • Poetry writing.
  • Pupils write to one another for a specific purpose.
  • Party   invitation.
  • Write a joke book (clarify boundaries).
  • Write a quiz on a particular topic.
  • Write a set of directions.
  • Devise an evacuation plan for the building.
  • Collate class   rules.
  • Give a sentence  – each child writes for 5 minutes starting with that sentence.
  • Give 6 to 8   words – build a story around them.
  • Letters of   thanks, complaint, invitation.
  • Display pupils’   written work – writing corner, corridor display, school anthology /newsletter.
  • Encourage pupils to ornament work for display.  Create   book covers.
  • Pupils read   written work aloud to class, assembly.
  • Write-a-Book.
  • Create boxes of facts etc. for projects.
  • Brainstorm for story writing and use questions to expand.    Sequence events.  Discuss different beginnings and endings.
  • Paired / group writing.
  • Write a book for younger family member / younger classes.
  • E-mail pen pal, friend, other school.
  • Provide middle of story – tease out beginning and conclusion.
  • Use rough work drafts before presenting final copy after discussion with teacher.
  • Earmark weeks for poetry, letters etc.
  • Read a story to the class and ask them to write a summary.
  • Take a paragraph from a familiar story / piece and re-write in own words.
  • Select a famous person whom you would like to interview and select questions you would ask.

 

Writing Sample Content for 5th & 6th Classes 

Creating & Fostering the Impulse   to Write

Developing Competence, Confidence   & the Ability to Write Independently

Clarifying Thought Through Writing

Developing Emotional &   Imaginative Life Through Writing

  • Experience a   classroom environment that encourages writing.
  • Observe the   teacher model a wide variety of writing genres.
  • Express and   communicate reactions to reading experiences.
  • Experience   interesting and relevant writing challenges.
  • Write for an   increasingly varied audience.
  • Receive and give   constructive responses to writing.
  • See his/her   writing valued.
  • Experience a   level of success in writing that will be an incentive to continue writing.
  • Write regularly on chosen topics.
  • Write for a sustained length of time.
  • Engage in the writing of one piece over a   period.
  • Experience varied and consistent oral   language activity as part of the pre-writing process.
  • Observe the teacher improving writing.
  • Write independently through a process of   drafting, revising, editing and publishing.
  • Write, without re-drafting, on a given or   chosen topic within certain time constraints.
  • Observe the conventions of grammar,   punctuation and spelling in his/her writing.
  • Use dictionaries and thesauruses to extend   and develop vocabulary and spelling.
  • Explore the possibilities of syntax and   sentence structure in reading and writing.
  • Choose a register of language appropriate   to subject and audience.
  • Choose a form and quality of presentation   appropriate to the audience.
  • Help others with editing their work.
  • Take part in co-operative writing   activities.
  • Write fluently and relevantly in other   areas of the curriculum.
  • Develop a legible, fluent, personal style   of handwriting.
  • Develop skills   in the use of information technology.
  • Write in a wide   variety of genres.
  • Examine the   characteristics that differentiate written and oral language.
  • Write for a   particular purpose and with a particular audience in mind.
  • Reflect on and   analyse ideas through writing.
  • Refine ideas and   their expression through drafting and re-drafting.
  • Express and   communicate new learning.
  • Relate new ideas   to previous learning.
  • Use notes to   summarise reading material and write an account from the notes.
  • Sketch an   ordered summary of ideas and draft a writing assignment on it.
  • Argue the case   in writing for a particular point of view.
  • Argue the case   in writing for a point of view with which he/she disagrees.
  • Explore the use   of compound and complex sentences in expressing thought.
  • Analyse in writing his/her reactions to   personal experiences.
  • Express in writing reactions to the   experiences of others.
  • Write stories and poems.
  • Write longer stories or a series of related   stories in book form.
  • Keep a personal diary.
  • Express a personal reaction to ideas,   emotions and images encountered in literature.
  • Express and analyse his/her reactions to poems.
  • Analyse different interpretations of poems   in writing.
  • Write about the relationship between poems   and personal experience.
  • Write short plays based on activity in   improvisational drama.
  • Express in   writing reactions to music, artwork, films, television programmes and videos.

Writing: Sample Methodologies for 5th & 6th Classes

 Note: Many teaching methodologies   appropriate to the development of writing capacity are inherent in the   content detailed on the previous page.

 

  • Supply   print-rich environment e.g. Fallon’s posters.
  • Narrative:

–            adventure

–            horror

–            plays

–            folk and fairy tales

–            historical

–            mystery

–            magic

–            science

–            fables

–            personal experiences

  • Provision of relevant topics.
  • Brainstorming,  webbing, research, conferencing.
  • Note-taking.
  • Instructions.
  • Newspapers.
  • Reports.
  • Persuasive text.
  • Explanations.
  • Formal / informal letters and faxes.
  • Reports and reviews.
  • Diary.
  • Editing,drafting and publishing.
  • Spelling, grammar, punctuation and layout.
  • Correction, self-correction, use of dictionary, thesaurus.
  • Write-a-book.
  • E-mail.
  • Poetry

Phonological Awareness / Spelling

 Hands on Phonics: In junior / senior Infants

Sounds at Work Folens: Junior / Seniors & First

Second – Sixth Class: Spellbound

5th / 6th: Additional work from Sounds O.K.

Spelling Programme in use for the whole school is Spellbound. (Folens)

Handwriting

Handwriting Programme in use in the school is Write here Folens (Juniors – Sixth Class)

* Second Class: Write On Introductory Cursive

Organisational Aspects of Our English Plan

 1.    Resources

In our school, we have the following resources to facilitate the implementation of our plan:

  • Ancillary materials from language scheme which include resource books, posters, worksheets, flashcards, tapes and CDs;
  • Well stocked classroom libraries including a selection of Big Books;
  • Prim-Ed Copymasters etc.;
  • Selection of toys, phones etc.;
  • TV and video;
  • Digital Camera;
  • Tape recorder / CD player in each classroom; and a
  • Computer and printer;

2.    Parental Involvement

At Doolin NS, we encourage and welcome the involvement of parents in their children’s education.  Such partnership is exemplified in:

  •  Annual Parent / Teacher meetings which allow for a discussion of individual children’s progress.
  • Informal Parent / Teacher meetings convened at the request of the parent or teacher.
  • Written communications via the child’s Homework Journal.
  • Other written communications e.g. School Newsletter.
  •  Implementation of partnership schemes which include our Shared Reading Programme .
  • Opportunities for parents to share their talents and expertise with us e.g. local writers, poets, artists, historians etc.

3.    Learning Support and Special Needs

Children with learning difficulties and special educational needs are helped to achieve their potential in the core skills of oral language, reading and writing.  Assessment is ongoing and an Individual Learning Plan (ILP) is drawn up and co-ordinated by the Learning Support Teacher in consultation with the class teacher, the pupil & the parents. Specific short-term targets are agreed between all concerned e.g. in relation to reading, homework, handwriting.  Regular consultation also takes place with external professionals e.g. Speech Therapist, Occupational Therapist. (Where necessary)  The class teacher maintains first line responsibility for the welfare of the child.  Suitable resources are provided to meet the learning needs of individual children.

4.    Linkage and Integration

While our English Plan is presented under the three strand unit headings of oral language, reading and writing, the practice in this school is that all three strand units are interlinked.  The manner in which our plan is organised also provides significant opportunities for its integration with all other curricular areas.

5.    Gender Equality

We are committed to the provision of equal opportunities to all our pupils in the implementation of our English programme.  Equal opportunities are provided to all pupils to participate in discussions, debates, reading and writing opportunities etc.  The use of language and textbooks deemed to be sexist is avoided.  Attention is afforded to developmental differences and remedial action is taken where appropriate.  We encourage gender awareness through promoting consideration of the roles associated with men and women in literature, the media, advertising etc. as well as consideration of the language associated with such roles.

6.    Class Libraries

In our school, a library is located in each classroom.

7.    Community Involvement

Pupils display their work in the local church at First Communion and Confirmation occasions.

8.    Assessment & Record Keeping

Oral language is assessed informally by each class teacher. Reading is assessed through a combination of teacher observation and standardised testing (Drumcondra Primary Reading Test, Micra T)  Diagnostic assessment is administered as required at Learning Support level.  Informal assessment by the class teacher is conducted on an ongoing basis.  Standardised assessment is administered on an annual basis during the final term.  Test results are used to establish the needs of individual pupils and to inform future planning.  Samples of the written work of individual pupils is collated to keep a record of his / her performance in different areas over the period of a school year.  Results of formal assessments are collated over the period of a child’s attendance at our school.

 9.    Staff Development

Staff development needs are identified through review and discussion at termly staff meetings.  When needs are identified, an action plan is devised to ensure that such needs are adequately addressed.  Responses may include the organisation of a staff development day / session, engagement of external expertise, attendance by a representative of the staff at specific in-service and / or the provision of required resource materials.  Notices of upcoming courses are circulated to each staff member.  Staff members who have attended courses are given opportunities to report back to other staff members during time allocated at staff meetings or a staff development day.

10. Timetabling

A weekly minimum of three hours is allocated for English in the Infant Classes and four hours from 1st to 6th Classes.  Extra discretionary curricular time is allocated to English as appropriate.  A significant emphasis is placed on the provision of discrete time for oral language in the Junior to Middle Classes with a greater focus on integrated oral language time in the Middle to Senior Classes.

Success Criteria

The school-wide implementation of this plan will result in enhancement of pupil learning in the following ways:

Oral Language

  • Increased confidence and competence in communicating.
  • Greater willingness to express opinions and participate in class discussions.
  • Improved listening skills.

Reading

  • Improved standards in reading.
  • Increased involvement in voluntary reading.
  • Involvement of parents in shared reading activities.
  • Experiencing of reading as an enjoyable pursuit.

Writing

  • Greater fluency and explicitness in communicating ideas and experiences.
  • Enhanced experience of writing and sharing stories and poems.
  • Use of ICT.
  • Improved presentation of written work.

The achievement of these success criteria will be assessed through feedback from teachers, pupils and parents.

Roles and Responsibilities

The implementation of our plan will be supported as follows:

Roles                                                                         Person(s) Responsible

Development of schemes of work                                    Class Teacher

 Assessment (Standardised / Diagnostic)                     Class Teacher / Learning Support Teacher

Co-ordination of Class                                                       Class teacher

Libraries

Purchasing of Resources                                                    Principal

Co-ordination of monitoring and evaluation                Principal

of plan

 atified by the BOM of Doolin NS

Date: ________

Signed: Chairperson: _____________

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Success Criteria

The school-wide implementation of this plan will result in enhancement of pupil learning in the following ways:

 

Oral Language

  • Increased confidence and competence in communicating.
  • Greater willingness to express opinions and participate in class discussions.
  • Improved listening skills.

 

Reading

  • Improved standards in reading.
  • Increased involvement in voluntary reading.
  • Involvement of parents in shared reading activities.
  • Experiencing of reading as an enjoyable pursuit.

 

Writing

  • Greater fluency and explicitness in communicating ideas and experiences.
  • Enhanced experience of writing and sharing stories and poems.
  • Use of ICT.
  • Improved presentation of written work.

 

The achievement of these success criteria will be assessed through feedback from teachers, pupils and parents.

 

 

Roles and Responsibilities

The implementation of our plan will be supported as follows:

 

Roles                                                                         Person(s) Responsible

Development of schemes of work                                    Class Teacher

Assessment (Standardised / Diagnostic)            Class Teacher / Learning Support Teacher

Co-ordination of Class                                            Class teacher

Libraries

Purchasing of Resources                                      Principal

Co-ordination of monitoring and evaluation       Principal

of plan

 

 

 

 

Implementation and Review

The implementation of this (reviewed) plan will commence in September ‘14.  It is intended that it will be implemented in full during this school year.  The plan will be reviewed in June 2017 and at the end of every third school year thereafter.

 

 

Ratification and Communication

This plan was ratified by the Board of Management of Doolin  NS at its meeting on _________ .  Parents may obtain a copy of this plan from the Principal or it may be viewed on the school website.